Tag Archives: kindness

Catch-UP Monday: Kindness – revisited

I first shared this post on kindness on August 13, 2012.  I have had many conversations with others about what I wrote in this post.  I continue to try and live those words.

Be kind, for everyone you meet is fighting a hard battle. —Plato

I recently read this.  Those are powerful words!  I think in the midst of my battle for survival and the courage and hope to keep going, I sometimes forget that I am not the only one fighting a battle.   Others are fighting just as hard.  Their circumstances may be different but their battles no less frightening and painful than mine.

I remember sometimes when I would be in the midst of feeling so lonely, so isolated, so scared that I wouldn’t get better, my husband would remind me that “so and so” was much worse off than me.  Of course, in the midst of my own hurt, I didn’t care if someone was worse than me.  Those were not words I wanted to hear.    It would make me angry.  Angry at him and angry that my pain, isolation, loneliness and fear were not being taken seriously.  Eventually I would calm down as the “fight or flight” action dissipated.  Then I would feel bad that I hadn’t cared about the others, about anyone worse off than myself.

I am trying to not let my own situation overshadow all those who are also suffering.  I am also trying hard to be kinder to myself and be more accepting of my limitations.

I recently read a very well written piece about being kind to ourselves.  You can find it at:  http://juliatuchman.tumblr.com/post/27924568863/pet-shop-prophet

Do you get what you give?

Life is an Echo

Life is an Echo

I have read many times things like:  “you reap what you sow  and “what goes around, comes around”.

We have all been told to treat others as we would want to be treated.  I truly believe that if you send good thoughts, good thoughts will come to you.  If you treat someone with respect you will be treated with respect.

Of course sometimes you can be the kindest person and say something wonderful and have the person receiving your kindness be mean and disrespectful to you.  I have had this happen with doctors who do not understand or believe that their treatment is the only treatment for me and do not want to hear what has worked or not worked for me.  When this happens, I remind myself that not everyone I meet is going to be this way.

Still, I try to instill in my life the words of this quote.  I try my best to send out positive in hopes of receiving positive in return.  I have received much positive from writing this blog in the friendships I have made through my blogging and the positive comments I have received to my posts.

How is your echo?

 

WE ARE FAMILY

I have mentioned so many times about my isolation. I have also mentioned that I have become strong enough that I can make a 20 minute journey (only with my mask on) into Target to grab an item or two as long as I don’t make a habit of it. Usually I don’t go by myself unless it is very early in the morning and the store is pretty much deserted. Recently I needed two graduation cards and my Seventh Generation Laundry Soap. I got up early and headed for the store. I managed to get the cards without a problem. Then I needed to get my laundry soap. The problem is that all laundry soaps are in the same area (including my Seventh Generation) along with all other fragranced household products.

As I made my way towards that section of the store, I worried about a reaction that might render me brainless and coughing and gagging. When my daughter or husband is with me I just stay a few aisles back and let them fetch my soap. Hmmm. Suddenly I saw a Target employee. I said, “Excuse me. I need some help.” He asked what I needed and I pointed to my mask and said that I have a very hard time with chemicals and could not go to the cleaning section to get my soap. Without any hesitation he asked what I needed and went off in search of my soap. A few minutes later he returned with my exact brand and size. He told me not to hesitate to ask for assistance any time I needed help.

Fast forward and I have made a quick trip with my daughter to pick out some party supplies and leave. Suddenly I hear someone ask if I need help getting anything. I turn around and see the gentleman that helped me weeks before. I said I was fine and he again reminded me that any time I needed assistance to feel free to ask for it. This made my day.

As we celebrate National MCS Awareness Month, I found it encouraging that not only did the gentleman help me but that weeks later he recognized me (Okay how could he miss me with my white charcoal mask with strings hanging down on the sides?), offered to help and once more reminded me that I should never hesitate to ask for help. While it is difficult to get out and do these short trips, I believe I am bringing some awareness to the plight of those suffering from multiple chemical sensitivity and environmental illness. I also I believe that I am showing my strength by venturing out in public with this mask covering my face, walking tall, and not allowing the mask and the looks on the faces of others to make me feel less than I am.

We who suffer with MCS and other environmental or “invisible” illnesses are much stronger than we realize. This is evidenced by the stance we take and the growing number of blogs and articles being written to raise awareness. We are STRONG and we will continue to raise awareness one blog or one article at a time. As I type this post, I am reminded of a song by Sister Sledge.

YES, WE ARE FAMILY!

Kindness

Be kind, for everyone you meet is fighting a hard battle. —Plato

I recently read this.  Those are powerful words!  I think in the midst of my battle for survival and the courage and hope to keep going, I sometimes forget that I am not the only one fighting a battle.   Others are fighting just as hard.  Their circumstances may be different but their battles no less frightening and painful than mine.

I remember sometimes when I would be in the midst of feeling so lonely, so isolated, so scared that I wouldn’t get better, my husband would remind me that “so and so” was much worse off than me.  Of course, in the midst of my own hurt, I didn’t care if someone was worse than me.  Those were not words I wanted to hear.    It would make me angry.  Angry at him and angry that my pain, isolation, loneliness and fear were not being taken seriously.  Eventually I would calm down as the “fight or flight” action dissipated.  Then I would feel bad that I hadn’t cared about the others, about anyone worse off than myself.

I am trying to not let my own situation overshadow all those who are also suffering.  I am also trying hard to be kinder to myself and be more accepting of my limitations.

I recently read a very well written piece about being kind to ourselves.  You can find it at:  http://juliatuchman.tumblr.com/post/27924568863/pet-shop-prophet